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    Giants Past and Present

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    The Orange and Black

    So why do the San Francisco Giants wear orange and black?

    Dan Fost wearing the colors. The cap, once lost, has been found but retired. (It was from the 2002 World Series, an event which has been purged from memory.) The jacket pays homage to the Jersey City Giants, a minor league team that fed stars like Monte Irvin and Hank Thompson to the New York Giants. Thanks to Ken Fost for the jacket and to Harry Barker-Fost for the photo.

    My former colleague from the San Francisco Chronicle, Anastasia Hendrix, posed that question last week. She was generous enough to include my answer in her story in this past Sunday’s Style section.

    Alas, my answer was incomplete. I knew orange and black were always there, and became dominant in the 1940s, but I didn’t know why. It’s obvious why, say, the Princeton Tigers are orange and black, and the Baltimore Orioles; they are following Mother Nature’s lead. But the Giants? (Or the Oregon State Beavers?)

    Thanks to a friend who is apparently more skilled searching the Internet than I am, a new possibility has emerged. This from WikiAnswers:

    Before managing the Giants, John McGraw managed a National League version of the Baltimore Orioles (not the AL Orioles of 1901, who would become the NY Yankees in 1903). When McGraw left Baltimore, along with some of his players, he also took the orange, black and white team colors to NY for the Giants.

    I want to do a little more research, before accepting that explanation. I looked at several books I have about the New York Giants, and while many talk about McGraw’s defection from Baltimore – he even brought many players with him – none mention the orange. (McGraw did try out Christy Mathewson in a game in Orange, N.J., but I’m pretty sure that doesn’t count.) Baseball Almanac has a great page on uniforms, and includes some information on the orange and black, noting that McGraw brought orange to the Orioles’ uniforms, and black to the Giants, but doesn’t mention the melding of the colors in either city.

    Baseball Almanac does cite a definitive reference, which I will need to track down:┬áMarc Okkonen’s book, Baseball Uniforms of the 20th Century (Sterling Publishing, 1991). Until then, hey, it’s Halloween – the whole country can celebrate the Giants in their orange and black!

    PITTSBURGH - AUGUST 1977:  First baseman Willie McCovey of the San Francisco Giants bats against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Three Rivers Stadium in August 1977 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by George Gojkovich/Getty Images)

    Photo of the great Willie McCovey in the road orange double-knits in 1977, from “Giants Past and Present.” (Photo by George Gojkovich/Getty Images)

    UPDATE (Nov. 5, 2012): This weekend, I bought Okkonen’s book, and what a beautiful thing it is. It clarified one point: McGraw did not bring orange to the Giants from Baltimore. (McGraw did love to fiddle with uniform design, and he’s the guy who introduced the collarless uniforms now de rigeur in baseball.) In fact, the Giants did not use orange trim until 1933 – the year after McGraw retired. They won the World Series that year, and orange has remained on the uniform ever since.

    Since the glory season of 2010, orange has returned to a prominence in Giants Nation not seen since the days of the double-knits in the 1970s.

    It’s also worth noting that when the New York Mets were established in 1962, they took their colors from the National League predecessors who had left New York five years earlier – blue from the Brooklyn Dodgers, and orange from the Giants. (Yet the Mets new ballpark at Citi Field pays far more homage to the Dodgers, and virtually ignores Giants’ history. I guess the Giants got the last laugh this year, getting Angel Pagan from the Mets.)