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    Bruce Bochy Looks Like the Best in the Business

    Big hat, big brain: Bruce Bochy (Photo by George Gojkovich/Getty Images)

    Today’s guest post is from Bleacher Report Contributor Simon Cherin-Gordon, a Berkeley High Senior who has been helping me on projects large and small on this site and elsewhere for the past year.

    After Bruce Bochy led the Giants on a second half surge that netted them an unexpected division title, many Giants’ fans were calling for Bochy to win the Manager of the Year award. While Bochy was deserving, so were others, including Padres’ skipper Bud Black, who won 90 games with a roster that most expected to struggle all year. The award went to him, and rightfully so.

    Bochy, meanwhile, went on to win the World Series, strengthening his position as one of the game’s best.

    However, it is only now, two months into the 2011 season, that we are seeing Bochy’s finest work. After an uneventful offseason, the Giants looked like they’d be caught in another fierce battle with better offensive teams out west, and would need heroic career years out of guys who already delivered their heroic career years in 2010. While Pat Burrell’s resurrection and Cody Ross’ hot streak could be attributed to Bochy, that may be giving him more credit than he deserves.

    In fact, the 2010 Giants may have underperformed in multiple, albeit subtle, ways. The 2010 team was 6th in the NL in total bases, batting average, and home runs, yet finished only 9th in runs scored, indicating an inefficient offense. On the defensive side, they led the league in fielding percentage as well as ERA, a seemingly fool-proof formula for allowing the fewest runs. However, Bud Black’s Padres allowed less runs than the Giants in 2010. And even when taking the end result of runs allowed and runs scored for San Francisco, their 92-70 record was slightly worse than their Pythagorean projection (a simple Bill Jamesian stat that projects W-L record based on run differential), which had them at 94-68.

    As anyone should have seen coming, the offense has taken a step back so far in 2011, and, to the surprise of many, the defense has gotten a whole lot worse. Mark DeRosa may eventually help some, and Aubrey Huff will likely pick his numbers up. Other than that, not many hitters are underperforming, and the lack of pop may be here to stay. The pitching staff is still excellent, but the defense has hurt them. Bochy doesn’t have the benefit of this being “the Giants’ year,” and needs to squeeze as much as he can out of this deep but flawed roster.

    He’s done so miraculously, using his depth to its full capacity and, in doing so, covering up the flaws. His game management, use of certain players in certain roles, and steady presence has the Giants winning way more than they should be. Despite the league’s 3rd best ERA and 13th best defense, San Francisco is 3rd best in the league in runs allowed. And while the Pythagorean projection says the team should be 23-24, Bochy has them at 27-20, solely atop the NL West.

    The toughest thing about managing the defending champs is the heightened desire around the league to defeat you, especially early in the season. Every other team out there circles the Giants on their calenders, and plays with an added intensity when they meet. Facing teams that are playing with an extra edge every single day can, and often does, prove to be too much for a defending champ. This leads to a scrambling manager, a belief in the players that they aren’t good as they were last year, and a downward spiral. Bochy and his 2011 club has been the antithesis of this. The Giants are playing more intensely than their opponents. Bochy has his player’s roles figured out and never panics when a decision backfires.

    Although no team has won back-to-back World Series titles since 2000, no manager of a defending champ has done as good a job as Bruce Bochy in a long time. And regardless of what happens this October, a return to the playoffs for this team should net Bochy the Manager of the Year award in a landslide.

    Read more of Simon Cherin-Gordon’s sportswriting here

    1 comment

    1. Dan Fost posted on May 26, 2011:

      Simon – Nice post! I couldn’t agree more. Bochy also has quite the predicament, trying to juggle a lineup with multiple injuries, and many people who are fairly comparable at various positions.

      With Pablo Sandoval hurt, he’s had to juggle Miguel Tejada, Mike Fontenot and Mark DeRosa on the left side of the infield – not ideal by any stretch, and made worse by DeRosa’s re-injury. Please, Manny Burriss, learn to play third and short!

      Same in the outfield, where he’s got Andres Torres, Cody Ross, Pat Burrell, Nate Schierholtz and Aaron Rowand to juggle among the three positions. Rowand looked to have forced his way into the conversation but he’s cooled and is back out of it.

      If the Giants keep struggling, they won’t be able to ignore Brandon Belt’s torrid hitting in Fresno much longer, and he’ll likely be the left fielder. Would Bochy platoon Ross and Schierholtz?

      He’ll have a similar decision when Barry Zito comes back, trying to find a role for his highest paid player while Ryan Vogelsong tears up the league.

      And Bochy is looking especially good now that the A’s — a near cloned team of great young pitching and mediocre veteran bats — have turned on Bob Geren.

      Thanks, Simon!

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